Tomatillo Guacamole

We’re happy to admit that we’re relatively new to avocado. Living in California, we are lucky to have constant access to it. Living near Hollywood and with a prior careers in the Entertainment Industry, we’re also lucky to occasionally be invited to taste foods from famous chefs for free. Unfortunately, sometimes that means an offal battle. Fortunately, sometimes that offal is covered in a heavenly Rick Bayless tomatillo guacamole. We’ve modified the prep into a more manageable recipe size, but it still makes a TON of guac. Plan accordingly. Don’t make this for just, say, you and your partner. You’ll eat all of it.

You can’t really halve the puree here. If you want to make less guac, you’re better off making the full puree and halving it before adding it to less avocado. We also advise buying about 1 1/4lb of tomatillos. You never know what’s under the husk, and sometimes tomatillos look fine and are totally weird. 

For a mixing and mashing bowl, we don’t use a traditional mortar or molcajete. Instead, we’ll use a Japanese suribachi with a citrus reamer. It’s something we already owned from making sake zuke, and didn’t much see the point of buying another piece of equipment to do the same thing. The suribachi wins out because you can also use it as a serving bowl if you need or want to.


Garlic, chiles, and cilantro

Here you’ll see about how fine you need to get your garlic, chiles, and cilantro. Food processor by Kitchen Aid. Our now discontinued model is over ten years old and still going strong.

chopping up tomatillos in the food processor

Here we’re adding our tomatillos, already husked, washed and quartered.

sieve straining the mixture

Drain the puree with a sieve. This is the sieve pictured, but these are currently the one’s we’re working with in the kitchen right now.

Japanese suribachi

We don’t typically use a traditional mortar or molcajete for guac. Instead we’ll use a Japanese suribachi and a citrus reamer for the best results. It’s something we already owned from making sake zuke, and I don’t much see the point of buying another piece of equipment to do the same thing. The suribachi wins out because we can also use it as a serving bowl if we need to.

As you can see, the combination of the surbachi and the citrus reamer makes very short work of smoothing out the mixture.

When it’s all mixed and mashed down good, this is the consistency you’re looking for, with some rustic chunks in there for good measure.

We’ll often make this recipe and serve half as guac with cucumber chips as a healthier alternative to tortilla chips, and half with tacos. Tacos rule.

Serve and enjoy! 

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